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different choices in education. you see one young man majoring in math and science. one young women majoring in, actually gender studies, literature, fields that are not going to pay as well as math and science. when they enter the workplace, you see more women going into nonprofits and working shorter hours and you see more men in investment banks and computer science. there isn't any reason that these two groups should be paid the same if they make different choices. now, a man and then the woman who start off at goldman sachs, they start out the same, they should be paid the same, but if they are not, there are avenues to dispute. that is the difference. >> host: what you think about the white house council on women and girls? >> guest: i think they need to have a council on men and boys. you can see the young men have lower earnings than young women. if you look at single men and single women in urban areas, the single men have lower earnings. you can see that their are far higher rates of voice dropping out of high school than girls. boys are getting less education now than girls. if th
and science. and more young women in gender study and literature. field that are not going pay as well. when they enter the workplace you see more women going in to non-profit and shorter hours and more men in and investment banks and computer science. there isn't any reason the two groups should be paid the same if they make different choices. a man and woman in the investment bank, they got out of cold man sacks. those should be paid the same. they are paid the same. if there are not there avenues to sue. that's the big difference. >> what dow you think about the white house counsel on women and girls? >> i think the white house needs to have a counsel on men and boys. because you can see that young men have lower earnings than young women. if you look at single men and women than the single men have lower earnings. you see they are far higher rates of boys cropping out of high school than girls. boys are getting less education now than girls. and so if the white house wants to have a counsel on women and girls, that's fine. as long as they have one on men and boys too. that i think is the
science. to know what rocks and soils are nearby and what they can reach or how long it might take somewhere, the use a combination of 3-d images, computer graphics, and simulations often overlaying them. these visualizations allow them to point to places, give them names, and control precisely where new photographs are taken and where the instruments are placed. so for example, they can draw a yellow box to specify where a camera should zoom in for a more detailed image. each photograph can be used like a map of an area on mars, because its location relative to the rover is precisely registered in the planning program. as we move him from panoramas used for navigating it manages about crops to the micro photographs, we can see and market up details. even small rocks and patches of soil might be named and become targets for analysis or a micro photographs. combining these planning tools in their imagination, the scientists can work as if they were on mars. jim rice, a geologist on a mission, said i put myself out there, with two boots on the ground trying to figure out where to go
and around the world, harmonize science-based standards, utilize risk-based monitoring and inspection, improve global surveillance, preparedness and emergency response, and to advance regulatory science. also, two years ago i told you that drug security was a top priority at fda. well, we now have the office of drug security integrity and recall that is located in cedar's office of compliance, up and running, playing the resources of strategies to the problems of counterfeiting, intentional adulteration, diversion, cargo theft, and other threats to the drug supply chain. but perhaps most important development is the passage of the food and drug administrations safety and innovation act of 2012, or what we fondly called fdasi. to improve patient access to new and better treatments, and to alleviate drug some shortages. fdasia also gives the fda important new authorities to protect the integrity of the to -- drug supply chain. thanks to fdasia we will receive enhanced information about drug manufacturers and the establishment and have the authority to develop a risk-based scheduled to i
science now in understanding and a lot of is informed by the psychology research and so the science of the mobilization turnout has gotten much better it's still pretty vague and it's reinvesting in a lot of mobilization techniques because we have learned in the last decade how they work as we have two separate things you sort of know once you get somebody to implicate voting by the two per cent and now we have better targeting techniques to figure out who you talk to and about what what message or targeting but the big campaigns do targeting and analysis on the front end of the allows them to understand far more precise clean way for their turn of targets and they don't need to talk to until who the persuasion targets are and if you are narrowing your universe the people you're trying to persuade you can make your messages sharper. you can sort of focus or qualitative research and focus groups and polling and an experimental testing to get more closely to the question of what that, what is at 7%. so you are talking to 7% and then not messages that are speaking to a far broader size
campaign and one of the things, after they won the nomination built what they call the data science team and increasingly that sort of function is becoming a core function of the campaign. it used to be that there were lists for fundraising or voter list and you could buy them from vendors or consultants and now, you know, basically it's a core function of a modern campaign to have people especially on the voter side just crunching and processing data. >> host: if any of us were to go into the romney campaign are the obama campaign and we were to look around the headquarters how many people -- is there a lot of young staff? what does it look like? >> guest: chicago dozens of people doing voter data and date and fundraising data on line analytics and every state there are jobs that are data jobs, voter file managers targeting directors. the obama campaign while thousands of people around the country hundreds of them are directly interacting with data every day. >> host: do you think one of the parties, the republicans are the democrats, is more adept at using this technique or they'll sor
on them. we we have a far better science now in understanding what mate voted people to vote and a lot of it informed by behavioral psychological research. the science persuasion still pretty vague, and so i do think that there's been a sort of reinvesting in a lot of mobilization techniques in part because we have learned in the last decade how they work. you have the two separate thing. you know when you get to somebody what you can do by increase their likelihood of voting by 2% with i have better techniques to figure out who you talk to about what. i don't think about it necessarily as message or targets. good campaigns do targeting and analysis on the front thanked allows them to understand in a far more precise clean way for who are the turnout targets who they don't need to talk to until it's time to push them to vote and the persuasion targets. if you're narrowing the people you can presuede you can make the message sharper. you focus the groups in polling and exoormt tal testing to get more closely to the question whether it's 7%, if you're talking 7% who are persuadable and n
see more young men and majoring in math and science and more young women majoring in actually gender studies, literature. fields that are not going to pay as well as math and science. then when they enter the workplace, you see more women going into nonprofit. you see more women working shorter hours and you see more than an investment banks in computer science. there isn't any reason that these two group should be paid the same if they make different choices. a man at a woman in an investment bank though that goldman sachs should be paid the same. they are paid the same and if they are not there are avenues to sue. but that is the big difference. >> what do you think about the white house counsel on women and girls? >> well i think the white house leak has a counsel on men and boys because you can see that young men have lower earnings than young women. if you look at single men and single women in urban areas, then the single men have lower earnings. you can see that there are far higher rates of voice dropping out of high school than girls. boys are getting less education now than
lab. the author of the sushi economy pulls the curtain that of the operatives that use social science to determine the outcome of elections. >> host: well, sasha this is a provocative and timely look as we are weeks away from the election. i want to know how did you come to want to write this book? >> guest: i covered campaigns beginning in philadelphia, so i was paying more attention to sort of tactics and techniques in the physical world of campaigns just because in the big city so much attention was being paid to the vote counted and precinct targeted so i talked to people that were making tv ads and i was always shocked as i think anybody that spent time on the campaigns is that most people couldn't explain to me why they did anything that they were doing. how do you know that and why do you do that and at some point they did it because the it always done it that we were they had some sort of a rule that wasn't based on any research. so some sort of skepticism about a lot of practices that were taking place and the way people were spending money and devoting time and resources and
all the furniture from the science wing. that'd show 'em. anna belle laughed her head-back laugh. learning happens in many different ways, i'm just saying. but even something this silly could get out of hand, and she knew it. the science teachers, especially, that was where scores most needed to come up. anna belle looked to the ceiling. after 15 years as an administrator, she knew ms. kaiser's kind. ms. kaiser was young, ms. kaiser had time and energy to spare and apparently tables too. [laughter] anna belle had been like ms. kaiser once, in another life, it seemed. can you tell carmen to lasso those teachers up? i told them, do not move furniture. then she hurried the talk along. ordinary drama made for a pleasant distraction, and after that there was still the matter of the squirrel eating through i.t. cables to address. after the meeting anna belle made her rounds. she came across a teacher agonizing over whether to shut down his fish tank. no be, anna belle told him, there's a living thing in there -- [laughter] so this next passage involves something that shouldn't ever hav
the assistant principal asked concerning as science teachers largess. somebody suggested confiscating all the furniture from the site and swing. learning happens in many different ways. the something this silly could get out of hand the pressure everybody was under. science teachers especially. anabel garza looked at the ceiling. she knew mr. kaiser was yon had time and energy to use but -- bair and tables she had the maker once. tell her to lasso the but. i told them not to move furniture. ordinary drama made for a pleasant distraction after the meeting she made her rounds coming across the teacher worried about turning down the fish tank due to drought conditions. there is a living thing in their. [laughter] so the next passage something that should never have to happen. a few months later anabel has rounded up some of her best students to go to the middle school. it was like scores are coming up and they need to show the middle school students they have a reason to come to reagan high. this will also include at the start athlete at the school at the time now at i was stay on a football
it be guided by science and by -- [applause] by accurate public policy analysis, by studies that show things like what are the rewards that are reaped from investment in public funding of contraception or in having everyone be insured as a society and what as a society do we gain from that, what is the consequences if we don't? it's been very disappointing to see the ways in which over the last few years science has really been pushed out of so much of our legislative process. there are bills that have been enacted across the country requiring medical providers to give statements to women who are coming for services, frequently abortion services, that are based on untrue science. and that's a scary moment regardless of how you feel about abortion and what your personal or legal beliefs are about that. to require medical professionals to mislead their patients is not where we should be as a country, and i think those type of scientific facts and accurate public policy analyses should be given much more credence in our political and government process than our ideology. [applause] >> i think i
of georgetown's institute for law, science and global security. and i apologize if i butchered your last names. we will correct that in the feeds. >> it's great to be with all of you this morning i want to issue an apology if any of you are a twitter follower of mine. i have about 11,000 of them, and i guess yesterday they all got a little telling them that it just seemed and in this fantastic video. if you just clicked right your they could see it. at i think there is of a thousand friends, cycling through, this is the first time, it's ironic that i've ever fallen for one of the sort of cyber gags. i don't know what information they got from the, but nonetheless i wanted to kind of mentioned it and out myself as someone who is falling prey to the very folks out in cyber land. we have with us as mentioned katherine as executive director of georgetown institute for law, science and global security. she directs the global, george and cybersecurity project, and she also interestingly in the past, work with someone i'm well acquainted with, brent scowcroft from 2002-2006 as counsel to the presiden
that have not been here before, is a science and technology not for profit policy think tank if you will win the washington, d.c. area that focuses on how science and technology affect the national security. for quite some time we have studied issues in and around what people callasymmetric threats and most importantly, terrorism. this past year professor alexander and i released our second volume on al qaeda about 11 years after the first volume on al qaeda right before 9/11, and we would like to call your attention to it. there are copies available year and of course available on the web at amazon always good things and i want to highlight it today because it is more of a gift we are going to give to our panel members for taking the time of their busy schedules to the very least i can promise you a good sleep if you read it. [laughter] the second look at the potomac institute has been involved in over this past year is an effort with the bechtel corporation to look at the cyber issue, in particular the seibu doctrine. that volume edited by tim and i is in the publication of you have on you
i think the worse case scenario is to be some cheesy science project dirty bomb or something with low you but you float into the seattle harbor or whatever on a container ship, or something like tel aviv harbor or whatever. so there's no like destroy the world scenario that's likely, in my opinion, with any of these terrorist regimes. and i think it's important for people who don't understand nuclear weapons to know that, to realize that. so the thing that occurred to me was you said, you were saying that if we had such a thing happen, like a hiroshima type weapon go off in one of the harbors or something like that, we wouldn't know at the time it's too late to know how to respond, where do you respond. so i guess my question would be, that's still the case now, how do we know where to respond? i guess other than iran and korea, how do we know even how to begin to respond now while we think these guys are developing their science project weapon? >> let me take the last part first. we have nuclear forensics for certain countries. we know the signatures of the weapons. russia,
's ideas. >> our guest next sunday taking your calls, the mills, and tweets. a science writer and columnist for discover magazine will look at the cyberworld, popular culture, and computer networking and politics liven in eastern. >> his thoughts on the interpretation of the u.s. constitution and what the author teams are many obtuse passages. the constitution cannot be understood by its original text alone, but through historical precedent. discusses his book with supreme court justice clarence thomas at the national archives here in washington. this is about power and 20 minutes. >> could evening. it's a pleasure to welcome you to the national archive. a special welcome to our friends at c-span and the other media outlets to are with us tonight. special guest in the audience today that i want to single out for special welcome, senator mike lee who is a good friend of the national archives. the future supreme court justice , he was at the u.s. court of appeals for the third circuit. welcome. on monday the constitution of the u.s. states turned 225. tonight's program is one of several that
question. that is sort of as much political science at something else. a big political factor, i don't want to sound too nerdy about this, but the rise of computer aids for districts are, the members of congress, state legislatures have created congressional seats in the house of representatives that are all democratic, all republican. there are relatively few seats. we have seen a bunch of change in the past couple of elections, but that is very much the exception rather than the rule. some members of the house of representatives fear, figure primaries more than they fear general elections, by and large. thus, they gravitate towards the margins of their parties. that does not fully explain the senate. because you can't redistricted senate, but it has had an enormous impact on the state and that the state legislature level. in the more polarized politics that we have. i also think that the news media plays a role in this. it used to be that there was a kind of shared set of assumptions and news. and everybody watches walter cronkite and they sort of made an effort to, you know, you could ar
does. a lot of people in here, remember the question in political science 101, should be elected representative do what he believes is right or what constituents because right? you could answer the question one way or the other. the important thing to take with them it is -- [inaudible] nobody wants to run for office so they can -- a robot into the you what to be a candidate because you believe in something. whatever you want to do. nobody wants you to just pull the lever for what the constituents you to do. so all a super pac and would do is identify places where the elected representative has gone too far from his constituency, and then educate the electorate about how the elected representative is sideways with the public opinion and the people. so you take that crossroads add, we're running it in all the states talk about the president has had this tennis program. testing this thing was wildly unpopular, and all the ads is hold the president or another elected official to account for what they did. it can't change public opinion about the stimulus legislation that we can iden
intelligence estimate and an independent assessment by the national academy of sciences to assess the ability of the united states to monitor compliance with the treaty and the ability of the united states to maintain in the absence of nuclear explosive testing of safe and secure and effective nuclear arsenals so long as these weapons exist. those reports on the related material will provide a wealth of information as the senate considers the merits of the ratification of the ctbt. of course we do not expect people to be in the preseason only mode. we anticipate and look forward to many substantive questions and items of discussion and debate that will undoubtedly come from our colleagues from capitol hill. looking upward from the administration has been calling on all the remaining to join us in moving forward towards ratification. there is no reason for them to delay their own ratification process waiting for the united states to ratify. the administration realizes this will be a difficult task on many levels, but it is nonetheless committed to moving the treaty for word so as the national
, and government funded research to push boundaries of science, research, chemistry, biology so smart risk takers turn them into new companies. that was the public side. the private side is the natural entrepreneurship. country. put that together. you get a great america, an an america that delivers on the american dream. we declined on the public side. we need to get back to reinvesting in that. >> host: mark in pennsylvania. plead, go ahead with the question for the two authors. >> caller: yes, i was wondering if -- hello? >> host: we're listening, mark. >> caller: yes, i was wondering if you think it's too late because if you looked at the amount we export and the amount we import from around the world that it might be too late to turn america around? >> host: michael? >> guest: it's not too late. we have exactly enough time to turn it around if we start now. we have the human capital, the resources, and the traditions, but we have to get serious about the challenges, and incidentally, we are bullish on american factories, and there's changes like 3-d printing technology that favors us. we'll
they build up the man immediately. >> excess demand for the platform is an early science and success and challenge as opposed to total failure. it is hard to know how large scale the test needs to be. large school districts, very large ones have a lot of students. doesn't take too many large school districts to be able to have a sufficiently sized test bed to do this rapidly. and to overcome that. we will find school systems willing to join. one avenue is the league of innovative schools and large school districts. this will be different but perhaps those schools signal interest and innovation and general technology to become part of the test bed to start to look and i hope this is something we can overcome but it will require some skill if we get a lot of excitement. >> could everyone join me in thanking our excellent offers an excellent panel. >> now the keynote speaker at the brookings institution forum. education secretary arne duncan talks about progress in k-12 education and his reform effort. following his remarks, questions from the audience. >> by the end of this decade to h
of the human mind would shock you. >> host: thank you so much. the secret science of winning campaigns is provocative and playing the groundwork for things to come. thank you for doing this. are you doing this going forward? >> i am reporting for slate. especially right teeing about the nuts and bolts. it is a fun time i will be out on election day. >> we will hear about it when the election is over. >> guest: thank you for having me. >> let me start tonight to ask you come at you focus on nine women per know-how do so let them? >> -- how did you select them? we could have done more but with the confine of the book you could only do so much. democrats, republicans, diff erent ages. we knew on the basis of nine you could not make generalizations that were 100% certain. conclusions were hypotheses that other people run with. in order to make that hypothesis we needed a diverse group. >> we also included women that was the white house project so several with men that the white house project identified olympia snowe, kathleen sebelius sebelius, they want to consider the notion with her
-intellectualism and hostility science, politicized religion is the sheet anchor of the tree or a 40-year-old culture wars and that's the end of that passage. i hope the listener does not construe this as a condemnation of religion. it is rather a condemnation of the merger of politics and religion that we've been seeing occurring over the last 30 years, a phenomenon that debases both politics and religion. as i conclude the tab turner, the united states has been fortunate to have a weighted sum of the worst aspect of europe's history. it had something to do with it, but so did the system of governments that permitted and encouraged religious pluralism, what america did not tubeless mandate a religious test for the office or basis for our domestic detentions as freedom of the bible. the party is attempting to do michelle long recredit. not so much for the republican party. what about the democrats? as i described them in the introduction, the democratic party hosted far too long on franklin d. roosevelt's legacy became complacent and began to feel entitled to its near hegemonic position in culture and the
the political campaign. his book is the victory lap. the secret science of winning campaigns. .. but, maybe i should start by orienting people to what the school book is. it's part of a series that oxford publishes called a very short introduction and they are short, they have about 300 titles, and they asked me to do a supreme court title. i guess about three years ago and the book cannot this spring. it came out on the eve of the health care decision. so, who knew three years ago that we would be faced with a supreme court dealing with the most closely watched and maybe one of the most contentious case in many many years, and i would be happy -- the book doesn't say anything about the health care case, so in the q&a, i would be happy to share some conversations about that with you. but i thought i would step back and give a little bit of my take on how the court has gotten to where it is, not so much current events, but really looking back to read the book starts with a little history. it's not a book of history. i may court watcher is what i think of myself as a core group be. what is inte
how we hire teachers. not to hire new math and science teachers and create 2 million more slots in our community colleges so people can get trained for the jobs out there right now. and i want to make sure we keep tuition low for our young people. when it comes to our tax code, governor romney and i both agree are corporate tax rate is too high, so i want to lower it, particularly for manufacturing. taken it down to 25%. but i also want to close those loopholes that give incentives for companies shipping jobs overseas. i want to provide tax breaks for companies investing in the united states upon energy. governor romney and i both agree that we've got to boost american energy production and oil and natural gas production are higher than they have been in years. but i also believe that we've got to look at the energy sources of the future, like wind and solar and biofuels and make those investments. so, all of this is possible. now in order for us to do agree how to to close our deficit in one of the things we will discuss tonight is how do we do with our tax code and how do we make sur
at elon college majoring in international studies with all sorts of minors, political science, and she has worked with refugees and her region. she is the president of halal on her campus and the millennial values fellow so we are pleased that she is back. last but not least, mohammad usman is a senior at depauw university majoring in urban policy and conflict studies with a minor in religious studies. he was a part of the national bioethics bowl, the winning team in the last year so congratulations on that. and before attending depauw was a special assistant in advocate for acts of civil legal justice at the university of new york school of law. so welcome to all of them. i would like to hear from all of you, and last night when we heard governor romney talk about states as the laboratory of democracy so while that may have been a republican democrat comment it got me thinking about our mayor and the work that they do in their communities and i'm going to hand the floor over to them. if you could both talk a little bit about how you see the future of american politics. >> thank you for ha
of systems all of which are so important to the asia-pacific region. and we'll continue all of our science and technology investments across the board. the third reason why we can carry out the rebalance is that we're shifting our posture forward and into the asia-pacific region; that is, not what we have, but where we put it is also changing. by 2020 we will have shifted 60% of our naval assets to the pacific. that's an historic change for the be united states navy. the marine corps will have up to 2500 marines on rotation in australia, we will have four la toral combat ships stationed forward in singapore, i was just aboard both in san diego last week, and we'll proceed fully to build out our military presence on guam and surrounding areas, which is an important strategic hub for the western pacific. we will begin to rotate b-1 bombers into the region augmenting the b-52 bombers already on continuous rotation. we've already deployed f-22s to kadima air force base in japan, and we will deploy the f-35 joint strike fighter to the region. differently, we're sending our newest assets to the
holding businesses responsible. >> in the light jacket. >> hi, i co-chaired the defense science energy security task force with jim schlesinger and i currently just been named the technical cochairman of the chief of naval operations vulnerability on energy security and i would like to talk about, first of i like to take the opportunity say that, the states and ferc on electricity and energy regulation, the states regulate almost exclusively for rate, rates, not for reliability at all. and ferc regulations are, they can take effect after a process that takes four to six years. in light of the rate of threat which is something else i wanted to talk about, we have no effective regulatory system. so i'm particularly concerned about sif and particularly concerned about cyber and i, i would like to call into question the perishability of cyber solutions. the lot of the discussion today, which i completely agree with all of it, focused on the cyber solutions to the cyber problems but i would like to point out that because of the rate of the threat, particularly with the bad actors, we might
test, we are well behind. we don't do well, but we are way behind in math and reading and science at various grade levels. so how do we overcome this problem? lots of important ideas. we heard earlier that there is a system approach. but what is motivating our proposal is that we take this american strength, which is innovation, we continue to lead on this. how do we take that creative engine and get it to k-12 education so we we can see improvements and qualities and outcomes and achievements for our students? >> if you look through history, whether it is transportation, our children listed in age that our ancestors could only dream of. we have computers, we have all sorts of new things. that really doesn't seem to happen until k-12 education. if you look at research and development, in k-12 education, it is one 15th the rate, of the u.s. economy overall. it is 152-1100 rate of what we see in innovative sectors like health care. what is getting in the way? well, what we try to do is first diagnosed what is giving away. i wonder standing back, we see what can we do about it. and t
in a prison fight. it nathan leopold basically will his body to science. biological tests, subjected his body to biological tests and it pulled the point. the thing that is ironic about it. the judge, the man who was the judge in that trial did not accept clarence darrow's argument. he sentenced them to life imprisonment because he was convinced in his memoirs he was convinced it would be the more cruel thing, the more cruel punishment. so clarence darrow never knew that this judge did not accept his argument. he actually made a wonderful argument against the death penalty, but the judge did not accept it. anyway. >> it is a famous argument, and it is a classic darrow argument in that it does not start at a endo disease. it starts as a end then it backtracks and wonders of them bring up in and no and be. if you talk for three days you can't go from aided be. the total impression will be lost. he had to sort of read back like of be looking for a flower. and one of the things that he consistently did in the trial, illinois had never executed teenager's in a case where they pled guilty, and so h
, that is a really great question, and that's really sort of a gun is as much political science as anything else. i think a big, a big factor is am i know, i don't want to sound too earthly about this, but the rise of computer redistricting strangely enough, that the members of congress, state legislatures have created congressional seats in the house of representatives that are all democratic or all republican. that are relatively few swing states. we've seen a bunch of change in the past couple of election, but that's very much been the exception rather than the rule. so minutes of the house of representatives fear primaries more than they fear generate elections by and large. and does they gravitate towards the margins of their parties. that doesn't fully explain the senate, because you can't redistrict the senate, but it is had and he knows impact at the state, state legislature level and the more polarized politics. we have also i think the news media plays a role in this. it used to be that there was a kind of shared set of assumptions and news, everybody watched walter cronkite or huntley an
years from 2007-2010 he served as chairman of the house committee on science and technology. bard is working with the brookings institution to improve public sector leadership as part of our new initiative on improving leadership and management. bill kristol is the editor of "the weekly standard," which he cofounded in 1995. prior to starting that he led the project for the republican future. he also served as chief of staff to vice president quayle and secretary of education bill bennett. he also served as foreign policy adviser to senator john mccain. i'm sure all of you see built regularly on "fox news sunday" and the fox news channel. i actually met bill in 1981 when he was a very young, assistant professor at the university of pennsylvania. it's been great to see all the things he has accomplished since that time. so the questions i'd like to pose for each of you come and i'll start with governor huntsman, what does the 2012 election reveal about the respected leadership styles of obama and romney? >> probably not much at this point. >> well, this panel is over. [laughter] >>
was held up the wilson center in june on science and technology and innovation. the symposia, which the institute co-chairs foot china's state council, not only promote dialogue among the stakeholders but allow the participants to develop personal connections. the institute also recently released an initial report on u.s.-china security perceptions, and other big project we are working on with leading research institutions in the u.s. and beijing. just last month we published the u.s. cooperation and clean energy and the review of the difficulties both countries face in developing solar, wind and other alternative energy industries and the potential room for cooperation. last november, finally, henry participated in another one of our national conversations entitled afghanistan is there a regional and gamecocks the story on this is interesting. he resisted when he learned we get organized a brilliant panel of scholars and reporters to comment on his remarks to the and we hadn't cleared the names with him. he didn't know all the people, and he was not happy. but he gave brief remarks
governance, the latest of which was held at the wilson center in june on science and technology innovation. these symposia, which the institute co-chairs with china's state council, not only promote dialogue among stakeholders, but also allow participants to develop personal connections. the institute also recently released an initial report on u.s./china security perceptions, another big project we're working on with leading research institutions in the u.s. and beijing. and just last week we published sustaining u.s./china cooperation in clean energy, an overview of the difficulties both countries face in developing solar, wind and other alternative energy industries and the potential room for cooperation. last innovate, finally -- november, finally, henry participated in another one of our national conversations entitled afghanistan: is there a regional end game. the back story on this is interesting. he resisted when he learned that we had organized a brilliant panel of scholars and reporters to comment on his remarks. we hadn't cleared the names with him, he didn't know all the people
the most government funded research to push the boundaries of science and technology so our best innovators and the entrepreneurs could pluck them and start these companies. if you think about that is a formula for success, and education we now -- well, roughly 30% of high school students drop out of high school. we used to lead the world in college graduates coming out of high school. we no longer do that. on infrastructure, according to the american society of civil engineers we are now $2 trillion in deficit in terms of infrastructure. immigration we have a policy to get a great education and then get the hell out of our country. we are fighting on the simplest h-1b issues that are so vital for our future strength. fourth, the rules for incentivizing risk-taking and preventing recklessness. i don't think that we have in any way remedied that the way we want and on the government funded research if it looks like an ekg heading for a heart attack. i don't know if they are relative to what. all i know is in the things that have historically made us great, on each one of those i see us not g
finance the transcontinental railroad. let's start the national academy of sciences. let's start the land grant colleges because we want to give the gateway if they are giving opportunity we are all going to be better off. that doesn't restrict people's freedom, that enhances it. so what i have tried to do as president is to apply the same principles. >> that's president obama from the debate this week on the role of government. now let's listen to his challenger, mitt romney, with his answer to that question. >> first, life and liberty. we have a responsibility to protect the life and liberty of our people and that means military second to none. i do not believe in cutting the military. i believe in maintaining the strength of america's military. second, in the line that says we are in doubt by our creator with rights i believe we must maintain our commitment to religious tolerance and freedom in this country. that statement also says that we are endowed by our creator with a right to pursue happiness as we choose. i interpret that as one, making sure those are less fortunate and can't c
, systematically underreported to science we now see a political reaction to the economic crisis of monumental proportions. tweedledum tweedledee, operations between two political parties, very much like republicans and democrats here. what was called the greek socialist party and they would alternate every few years and they would change the. this year, everything increased changed. after the crunched down on the greek people, making them pay for crisis that has nothing to do with those and then paid for bailing out the richest folks in greece, etc., the greek people did what no one thought they would. the majority of people did not vote for either of those two parties, trying to understand what it was like to vote for neither the republicans are the or the democrats. in the last two elections, democracy and socialist party together brought under 40% that can bind the vote. an explosive party is the party called the cerise a party. it is a far left-wing party that is against all oesterle programs and wants to solve greece's problems they want to take wealth away from the greek rich. they got
as chairman of the house committee on science and technology. bart is working with the brookings institution to improve public sector leadership is part of our new initiative on improving leadership and management. william kristol is the editor of "the weekly standard," which he cofounded in 1995. purchaser is not view of the project for the republican future. he also served as chief of staff to vice president quayle and secretary of education, bill bennett. he also served to john mccain. all of these t-bill regularly on fox news sunday in the fox news channel. i actually met ellen 1981 when he was a very young assistant professor at the university of pennsylvania. it's been great to see all the things he's accomplished since that time. so the question i would like to pose for each of you, and i'll start with governor huntsman. what does the 2012 election reveal about the respective leadership styles of obama and romney? >> probably not much. >> okay, what this panel -- >> see you later. >> you can extrapolate a few things from president obama's first term that might be instructive. he isn't
not 13,000. if the 13,000 i will pay my teachers $75,000. come on. it is not rocket science. but it is hard political work. the political will to meet the needs of children whose needs have never ben that to this tremendously hard. >> richards argument is incredibly frustrating and personal because these inner-city year in their statistical likelihood to graduate is less than 50%. we cannot say we are making progress like that is not a o k. we have to take a totally different look at public education, everything kit and how do we take we found in pockets and get them to millions of kids. that is a massive challenge. i just tried to argue we have good indications of what those elements are. i went to europe city public schools the likelihood of the graduating with the regents diploma was 5% i went on in to graduate from high school and had great principles. that is not should not be determined by luck or view you were born to four years of code the attendance of high performing schools public charter schools to give the choice to parents to pick what is best for them. we trie
have a very strong science and technology directorate that works collaboratively to research, develop tests and transition deployable cyber solutions and technology. so among its many projects, s and t is leading efforts to develop and deploy more secure internet protocols to protect consumers and industry internet users. and because each member of the public plays an important role in cybersecurity, we sponsor the stop, think, connect campaign. this is a year-round national public awareness effort designed to engage and challenge americans to join the effort to practice and promote safe online practices. we want good cyber habits to be as ingrained and as familiar as putting on your seat belt. so if you're not already a friend of stop, think, connect -- the stop, think, connect campaign, i encourage you to join today. and in just a few days, we will kick off national cybersecurity awareness month which is an opportunity each october to emphasize the culture of shared responsibility necessary to maintain a safe, secure and resilient cyber environment. finally, we must work internation
the most government funded research fop push out the boundary of science and technology our best innovators and entrepreneurs can pluck them and start the new company. it you think about that as the formula for success an education we now -- well, roughly 30% of high schools drop out of high school. we used to lead the world in college graduates coming to high school. we no longer do that. on infrastructure, according to american society of civil engineers we're $2 trillion in deficit in terms of infrastructure. immigration, we have a policy now that basically says here come here get a great education and get the hell of our country. we are fighting on the simplest h1b issues that are vital phenomena the future strength. fourth the rules for incentive risk taking and recklessness. i don't think we have em i didded to the degree we want. on government funded research if you see in the gap it looks like ekg heading for heart attack. i don't know relative to what all i know in terms of the things that historically made us great, on each one of those, i see us not going in the direction we shou
in the science and in the super committee and that template is you have to do a large amount of spending reforms. assemble lectures on the route to higher revenue tax reform. you just have to follow that template and we would get to wherever need to to go. >> diane, what to make of this baseline issue? >> wow, i'm it is sad we have to rely on actually going over the cliff to stick to the current law baseline. that is my main reaction to it. and now, i think that it is too bad that it's been so hard to raise revenues because of the pledge. i think especially given that there's so many ways of raising tax revenues. so it goes back to my hope, that we can somehow get a budget process in place that honors the current law baseline, today's current law baseline and stick to it more aggressively. >> if i could just make one budget comment, which understand the question is about politics, but as officially scored in the joint on tax cbo, for example you made a policy that would extend permanently half of the tax in the fiscal cliff, because they're not to happen, that would be scored as a tax cut in the
and every like to possessors of political science speculating in the abstract about the nature of international politics. you may wonder why it was because of fact the only thing worth talking about was at that point whether we could establish enough confidence between the two of us to risky adventure that opening to china representative for both sides shown that point of view, from a domestic, political point of view. and even though the subject of president nixon to china, was the reason why i came, neither side mentioned it until about 12 hours before. i mention not only to say i believe it should be followed to get your object it straight before you start haggling about details. we had no choice. now every generation and then was a great reform and i cannot think of any other country where you could definitely say that the evolution that we have seen in the last 30 years, depending on the vision of one man, as in the case of no other chinese who had the vision and the courage to move china into the imaginative system and to engage the reform and instituting a market system.
." brigid callahan harrison, professor of political science at state university. herb jackson, washington correspondent for the record hurt and my colligan chief clinical correspondent for njtv. we have questions reported earlier by the news director of wbgo-fm, doug doyle, which is seen throughout the broadcast. here's the rules throughout the debate. each candidate will have 90 seconds for an opening and closing statement in a show of 60 seconds to answer questions from our panel. then move onto the next question. there is a timing light here to keep us on schedule. it is my job to try and force that. the audience has promised once again to make my job a bit easier and show proper respect to the candidates by holding their applause until we have this broadcast. it conducted during the conversation during the broadcast come you can follow us on twitter using the hash tag and jay debate. let's begin. we tossed a coin. senator kyrillos goes first. kyrillos: mike, thank you very much and to njtv and montclair state for this debate. you know, i love this country. i love america. all of us ar
harrison, professor political science at my here at montclair state university. herb jackson, washington correspondent for the record. and my colleague, michael aron for njtv. we have questions reported earlier by the news director of wbgo-fm, doug doyle throughout the court pass. here are the rules. each candidate was 90 seconds for an opening and closing statement and each will have 60 seconds to answer questions for our panel. then we will build onto the next question. there is a title like that keeps us on schedule and it is my job to try to enforce a timing light. the audience has promised once again can make my job a bit easier and show proper respect to candidates by holding a pause until we end this broadcast. if you'd like to join the conversation during the broadcast, follow us on twitter using the hash tag mj debate. we tossed a coin. senator kyrillos goes first. your opening statement. kyrillos: mike, thank you very much. thank you to the record at montclair state and you senator menendez for this debate. you know, i love this country. i love america. all of us are blessed to
there's history, social studies, science and not part -- >> don't forget band and trauma. >> for their informed citizens what can our organization do more about that? islamic school boards often times dictate the curriculums and what kind of history is being taught and if the teaching african american history starting with 1865 and abraham lincoln on through and that's all you get about the black folks and the latino history starts with i don't know, 2006. that is how some of these issues are being framed. you get these type of - out there and you're wondering why your kids are not worried about this will involve or understand the history and why the need to be involved. it wasn't until the senator was in the united states senate he said before it was the first republican reconstruction and texas. the way the republicans took over the state of texas the first ran for the state board of education. democrats totally overlooked it. what they recognized was this was pure politics. they looked at the election and they saw how many it took to win the seats in the previous elect
. and so, you know, eventually i ended up in you see santa barbara as a student of political science. i think having grown up rural and kind kind of small, i guess i never imagined i could work in the white house or be part of the political campaign like the obama campaign. so i always coming in now, i was let the chance to do is talk like this because i hope there is something a mystery that might be inspiring as you allege are your success. and i think washington d.c. was for me on the other side of the road when i was going up but i know the world is smaller now and more accessible. but i think we can dream big dreams as my boss likes to tell me. my old boss likes of tommy. so we are going to talk about kind of my path to the white house. just quickly though, so i like to say that everything i learned about winning and success they learned on the campaign trail. there is always a winner and a loser. the political environment, just like the business world is highly competitive. and with every campaign season, there's always innovation incubators if you will. and so, guess the campaign
to actually do something that will be good for patients and good for science going forward so this is the one thing that didn't make it. the other little thick that didn't make it is now the safe dosage act, passed in the last minute, by the senate, and that's awaiting the president's signature, but one of the things that's necessary in terms of the resources is that this has to be a global enterprise. one of the things that is happening globally is the leading pharmaceutical companies in the united states, in europe, in japan have banded together to work with interpol to ensure they have enough resources to go after the bad guys around the world, and we've just started that. i think we're going to kick that off here next month. we've been discussing this with interpol, and we think we have a good program to help country's specific enforcement agencies with the global respective of interpol. yes, it costs money. it is money well spent, but more importantly, it gets us the heart of the trust that patients have to have in our medicines. >> ralph, i know as we've worked on the partnership and bu
of the house, science, space, and technology committee as well as a confer rei on -- conferee on the faa committee, i realize making the skies safer, less congested, and cleaner requires substantial investments. we must invest in the future, but we have to invest wisely. i'm concerned with the department of transportation, inspector general's april 2012 # report that the en route implementation schedule slipped by four years, and over budgeted by $330 million. in addition, i understand that although progress is being made, the agency has had difficulties in developing performance metrics for next generation goals. i want to thank you chairman petri and ranking member costillo, for holding the hearing, and i look forward to the testimony of the witnesses today because i believe we have to implement the next generation technology. thank you, and i yield back. >> thank you, and now we turn to the first panel, and i'd like to welcome the honorable john portcari, the u.s. secretary of the department of transportation, the acting administrator of the faa. welcome to both of you, and our regula
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